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Want a curved display from Samsung but don't quite have the scratch to bring one of its gigantic models home? Maybe try the 27-inch S27D590C monitor on for size when it releases at some ambiguous point in the future. The firm seems to be targeting gamers specifically with the monitor, saying that the curve creates a wider field of view (178 degrees horizontally and vertically, if you're curious) and gives the screen a "3D-like" effect when you're playing shooters and racing games, among other genres. There's even a one-button game mode that makes a few adjustments to compensate for motion blur, color and contrast too. Unlike Dell's not-flat display, however, this one's limited to a paltry 1,920 x 1,080 lines of resolution and a 16:9 aspect ratio. This'll probably be fine for us commoners, sure, but it might not be enough for the PC Master Race.

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Apple isn't the only one that's making its software a lot more secure, and erm, fed-proof -- Google's upcoming Android platform will apparently be encrypted by default, according to The Washington Post. The publication didn't clarify whether it's Android's full-disk encryption, which Google first rolled out in 2011, but it did say that nobody can access the encrypted device (not even the company), unless they know its four-digit pin. Does that mean users will be forced to nominate a passcode upon setup? We don't know for sure, but with encryption in place, Mountain View (just like Apple) won't be able to assist authorities in searching your phone, so long as you keep your passcode a secret.

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Google wants to get rid of frustrating 404 error pages and make websites still feel interactive even if you're not connected to the internet. So, the company has recently developed a new technology called "Service Workers," and Google software engineer Alex Russell talked about it at length during the O'Reilly Velocity conference in New York this week. To be precise, Service Workers is a new browser standard that will allow websites to store documents locally (similar to apps), in order to render cached pages or any other interactive content anywhere you are. Say, you're loading a website just as you enter a tunnel or reach an area with no coverage, you'll then see an older version of the site instead of getting an error message. As Russell puts it, "We want to load something instead of nothing."

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Back in 2012, a UK company called Oxford Nanopore announced a chewing gum packet-sized DNA sequencer, something that people found hard to believe since rival machines can be as big as fridges. After dealing with technical issues and bugs (as well as being accused of launching vaporware), Oxford has finally begun making that device called MinION available to beta testers. Several of the testers (mainly scientists doing research in educational institutions) reported that it only exhibits a 60 to 85 percent accuracy. While that's nowhere near more traditional sequencers' 99.99 percent accuracy, many of the testers still believe that the device could be a game changer due to its size and relatively affordable price. Traditional sequencers could cost as much as $1 million, while the testers bought their MinIONs for only $1,000 each.

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Your tablet can fire off emails and help you rotate beautiful, Escherian worlds, but can it capture the world around you in glorious 3D? Probably not, but the newly revealed (and Android-powered) Aquila from Mantis Vision and Flextronics can. Most of its spec sheet reads like any other top-flight tablet's would -- it's got a 8-inch screen running at 1900 x 1200 and a punchy Snapdragon 801 chipset ticking away in there -- but the telltale dual image sensors 'round the back make it clear this isn't your average Android slate. By capturing regular color footage and infrared depth data, the Aquila can put together an awfully detailed spatial representation of your surroundings.

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Today marked a special occasion in Engadget history: it was the day we published a story about making butter infused with marijuana. That isn't all that's happened in the past 24 hours, though, we also have a guide to the new iOS 8 keyboards, spotted that Aubrey Plaza is voicing Grumpy Cat and a whole lot more. Just check out the gallery below!

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We probably won't confuse Facebook's front page with a Twitter stream anytime soon, but today the social networking giant announced it's fixing one big problem (again): surfacing posts while they're still relevant. If you regularly log on to keep in touch with friends, family or enemies and let the site order updates by itself you've probably seen it -- posts popping up days later with old news, or worse, something that was relevant, if it had showed up at the appropriate time. There's nothing worse than missing out on a late night burrito run (we suggest creating an industry-wide mailing list to coordinate your activities and agendas in secret) or missing an opportunity for a joke, and Facebook is trying a couple of things to change that.

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iOS 8 is finally here, and it's bringing a slew of new features. It's faster, more secure, and in a lot of ways, more like Android. Out of all the new bells and whistles what are your favorite new additions? Head over to the forums and let the community know what you're digging most about iOS 8. When you're done there don't forget to write your own review! We'll be rounding up the best of the best in an upcoming post.

Photos by Will Lipman.

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Good news? After a shocking announcement by Twitpic that it would close its doors as a result of action by Twitter, now the company has announced that's not shutting down after all. There are no specific details, but in a tweet, it says "We're happy to announce we've been acquired and Twitpic will live on! We will post more details as we can disclose them." Your guess is as good as ours as to the buyer, but this may explain a recent dispute that saw Twitpic founder Noah Everett blocking efforts to back up the site's pictures before they disappeared. All that matters now, is that your pre-Instagram photos are safe.

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Does that curious little contraption above look familiar? That's probably because it's DIWire Bender, the rather unusual desktop device created by Brooklyn design firm Pensa, which won our judges' hearts at last year's Insert Coin competition. We say unusual, because DIWire Bender boasts very specific skillset: bending metal wires for makers, crafters and just about anyone who could use it. We caught up with Pensa founder Marco Perry to talk about how the project's been doing since the team took home $10,000 for winning Judges' Choice. By the sound of it, its victory really got the ball rolling: the team's Kickstarter campaign that launched right after Insert Coin, for instance, reached its $100,000 goal in just one day.

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